$13.3 million raised for Michigan 4-H to prepare youth for the future

The Campaign for Michigan 4-H's Future
The Campaign for Michigan 4-H's Future

The Campaign for Michigan 4-H's FutureThe Michigan 4-H Foundation Campaign for Michigan 4-H’s Future concluded Dec. 31 with $13.3 million raised during the past seven years, making it the largest campaign in the foundation’s history, said Sara Stuby, Michigan 4-H Foundation president.

Leadership donors at the March 14 Campaign Celebration:

The Michigan 4-H Foundation Board of Trustees hosted a campaign celebration event March 14 to celebrate the conclusion of the campaign and exceeding the campaign goal. Pictured are Leadership 10 members (back row) Sally and Dale Stuby, Julie and Larry Chapin, and (front row) Noel and Sandy Stuckman.

In the previous campaign, which concluded in 2007, the Michigan 4-H Foundation raised $10.3 million.

This campaign, publicly launched in 2014 in conjunction with Michigan State University’s Empower Extraordinary campaign, set a $12.5 million goal to prepare Michigan 4-H youth to step up to the challenges of a complex and changing world. As a result, more youth in every Michigan county have learned to make healthy life choices, are active citizens and engaged in leadership and service, are critical thinkers and problem solvers, and are college-bound, work-ready and financially smart.

“Thanks to investments from those who care about young people in our communities, Michigan 4-H is well-positioned to prepare youth for the future,” said Jacob DeDecker, state leader for Michigan 4-H Youth Development, Michigan State University Extension.

With more than 4,175 total donors to Michigan 4-H, the campaign finished with over $1 million raised in just the last few months of the campaign.

“This accomplishment would not have been possible without great leadership and support,” said Jeffrey Dwyer, MSU Extension director. “A very important group of people who provided critical leadership to this campaign is the Leadership 10. This is a group of individuals who formed the core group of donors and who made significant financial commitments to this campaign early on. We have turned to this group time and again for their support, and they always say yes and always lead the way.”

The Michigan 4-H Foundation Board of Trustees hosted a campaign celebration event March 14 to celebrate the conclusion of the campaign and exceeding the campaign goal.

Impact

  1. The creation of 27 new programs, expanding MSU Extension 4-H Youth Development in the areas of:
  • STEM – Science, technology, engineering and math.
  • Healthy lifestyles.
  • Leadership and civic engagement.
  • Workforce readiness and financial literacy.
  1. The creation of 43 new endowment funds, doubling the endowment investment to serve 4-H for the future. This includes 31 county endowments created in communities around the state for county 4-H program delivery.
  1. Significant 4-H facility improvements at the Michigan 4-H Children’s Gardens on the MSU campus and at Kettunen Center, the Michigan 4-H conference center. At the Michigan 4-H Children’s Gardens, contributions funded the construction of outdoor restrooms. At Kettunen Center, gifts funded two new shooting sports ranges and the renovation of the waterfront.

Historic Results

  • The single largest gift to Michigan 4-H was received during this campaign in December 2013. The $3.85 million estate gift comprised a $1.85 million cash and a $2 million property distribution from the Mary (Sally) and Donovan (Pete) Smith trusts to the Michigan 4-H Foundation. The gift primarily provides support for the Michigan 4-H Children’s Gardens.
  • For the first time, the foundation offered a 1:1 county 4-H endowment match opportunity for the creation of local 4-H endowments. This resulted in 31 county 4-H endowments being established or grown through the Make the Match County 4-H Endowment Campaign. The match was built by private investments in a $1 million match pool.
  • During the campaign period, the Michigan 4-H Foundation’s total endowed assets nearly doubled, growing from $2.78 million to $5.5 million.

The multi-year Campaign for Michigan 4-H’s Future will end Dec. 31, 2018.

As of Oct. 15, 2018, total giving for the Campaign for Michigan 4-H’s Future totaled $11.98 million – 96 percent of the $12.5 million campaign goal – with just over $500,000 to go by December 31.

Here’s how you can make an impact and support 4-H through one or more of the following:
4-H program support provides science literacy, healthy lifestyles, leadership and civic engagement, workforce readiness and financial literacy.
4-H volunteer development ensures that 4-H volunteers are recognized, trained and supported for their work with youth.
Facilities improvement maintains place-based learning at Kettunen Center and/or the Michigan 4-H Children’s Gardens.
Endowments established provide perpetual support for 4-H programs or facilities.

As you consider your giving, reflect on what it is that you care most about in 4-H – whether that is empowering youth, training volunteers, growing a local or statewide endowment, or documenting a planned or estate gift in support of Michigan 4-H can leave a legacy for years to come and help toward the campaign goal.

Gifts must be received by Dec. 31, 2018 to count toward campaign totals.

DONATE NOW

For more information on the campaign and ways to support 4-H, contact Amanda Masters at 517-884-4691 or amasters@msu.edu.

 

74.5% to goal $9.32 million of $12.5 millionThank you for helping us to log another million dollars for Michigan 4-H’s future! As of Nov. 15, 2016 total giving for the Campaign for Michigan 4-H’s Future totaled $9.32 million – 74.5 percent of the $12.5 million campaign goal. The campaign has two years and $3.2 million more to go.

The Campaign for Michigan 4-H’s Future has a $4.5 million goal for statewide 4-H program support for science literacy, healthy lifestyles, leadership and civic engagement, workforce readiness and financial literacy, and volunteer development.

Featured Focus – 4-H Healthy Lifestyles
4-H healthy lifestyles programs give young people the tools and knowledge they need to eat right, exercise often and navigate the tough choices they often face as they enter adolescence and their teenage years . With increased support for 4-H healthy lifestyles programs, more Michigan youth will learn to make healthy life choices.

4-H healthy lifestyles is at 31 percent of the $500,000 goal. Programs supported include a new career and fitness curriculum, the Molina Teen Health Challenge and several Walmart Youth Voice: Youth Choice grants to expand 4-H health programs in local communities. Read more about the Walmart grant.

We are pleased to report that The Campaign for Michigan 4-H’s Future has surpassed the $8 million mark. As of Oct. 31, 2015, gifts and pledges total $8.15 million or 68 percent of the $12.5 million campaign goal.

A major component of the campaign has been to raise awareness and support of local 4-H programs through the Make the Match County 4-H Endowment Campaign. Many friends have said yes to sustain 4-H programs in their communities through investments to establish and grow county 4-H endowments.

In addition to support for local 4-H programs, The Campaign for Michigan 4-H’s Future has a $4.5 million goal for statewide 4-H program support for science literacy; healthy lifestyles; leadership and civic engagement; workforce readiness and financial literacy; and volunteer development.

4-H leadership and civic engagement (LCE) is at 63% of the $500,000 goal and has supported the New York Life Youth in Governance Project, 4-H Capitol Experience, international 4-H exchange programs, Michigan 4-H Youth Conservation Council, Operation Military Kids, the Monsanto Challenge and Ag Innovators experiences.

LCE programs provide young people with life-learning experiences to increase their ability to set goals, solve problems, make decisions, and enhance their written communication and public speaking skills.

As of June 30, 2015, The Campaign for Michigan 4-H’s Future has raised $7.9 million, 63.2 percent of the $12.5 million goal.

Leadership for The Campaign for Michigan 4-H’s Future includes the Leadership 10, a group of 4-H campaign volunteers; trustee leadership, supporting the Leadership 10 in campaign fund development; and foundation staff members, providing guidance and support for the foundation’s campaign volunteers.

The Michigan 4-H Foundation’s Leadership 10 is a group of 10 couples who have assumed the role of serving as the face of the capital campaign by sharing their compelling 4-H story and support of Michigan 4-H. These carefully selected individuals provide their leadership through their generous gifts and participation in foundation campaign activities. Learn more about the Leadership 10.

Although contributions from July 1, 2011 through June 30, 2018 are included in campaign totals, The Campaign for Michigan 4-H’s Future public launch was Oct. 3, 2014, at the 4-H Town and Country Gala at the Downtown Market in Grand Rapids, Mich. Guests celebrated the initial campaign investments that help 4-H engage youth in relevant and interesting ways today, grow and diversify its volunteer base, and enhance program delivery to best serve the needs of Michigan’s young people well into the future. Recipients of the 4-H Emerald Awards were also honored at the gala.

As of Oct. 31, 2017, total giving for the Campaign for Michigan 4-H’s Future totaled $10.28 million – 82 percent of the $12.5 million campaign goal.

With just over one year of the campaign left and $2.22 million to go, 4-H needs you.

Consider how you can make an impact and support 4-H through one or more of the following priority areas:

  • 4-H program support: science literacy, healthy lifestyles, leadership and civic engagement, workforce readiness and financial literacy.
  • 4-H volunteer development ensures 4-H volunteers are recognized, trained and supported for their work with youth.
  • Facilities improvement at Kettunen Center or the Michigan 4-H Children’s Gardens.
  • Endowments – can be established and provide perpetual support for 4-H facilities or county or state 4-H programs.
  • Planned gifts – documenting a planned or estate gift in support of Michigan 4-H can help toward the campaign goal.

As you consider your giving, reflect on what it is that you care most about in 4-H – whether that is empowering youth, training volunteers, growing local or statewide endowment or documenting a future gift to leave a legacy for years to come.

For more information on the Campaign for Michigan 4-H’s Future and ways to support 4-H, contact Amanda Masters at (517) 884-4691 or amasters@msu.edu.

Noel and Sandra StuckmanNoel Stuckman and Sandra Clarkson Stuckman, of DeWitt, have documented a planned gift that will help ensure the viability of Michigan 4-H for the future.

“We had been giving cash gifts regularly, and as we got older we thought we had to get more organized in our approach, and it was time for an estate plan,” Sandy said.

A planned or deferred gift is a donation that is arranged by the donor, typically through a will, trust or estate plan, to be allocated at a future time, often after the donor has passed away. Planned gifts can be funded with cash, equity or property through a variety of gift vehicles.

The Stuckmans had each been donors to the Michigan 4-H Foundation and Michigan State University prior to their marriage in 1999. Their annual charitable contributions have been through a variety of outright methods including cash, pledges, appreciated stock, qualified charitable distributions from IRAs and in-kind gifts of property. Over the years, their annual gifts have supported state and county 4-H endowments, Kettunen Center, the Michigan 4-H Children’s Gardens, the MSU Spartan Fund, the MSU College of Agriculture and Natural Resources Department of Agricultural, Food and Resources Economics and the Doris Wetters Endowed Fellowship Fund. They are also donors to the MSU Horticulture Gardens, Wharton Center and WKAR.

“We want those organizations to continue,” Sandy said. “That’s why we give – because we care about the results of these programs for people. And that’s the basis of our philosophy for philanthropy.”

Both Sandy and Noel grew up as 4-H members in Indiana. Noel received his bachelor’s degree in agricultural economics at Purdue University. He had a career with Michigan Farm Bureau affiliate companies.

“4-H was a part of my life,” Noel said. “My first project was a 4-H Victory Garden – World War II home garden. Then my projects grew into livestock, Berkshire hogs, Ayrshire dairy cattle, county fair, state fair, hogs to the International Livestock Exposition in Chicago.

“I believe that 4-H has a great future,” he continued. “That’s why we’ve decided to direct our money to the Michigan 4-H Foundation. It does a lot of great things, it’s a great support group for 4-H and we believe in it.

“An estate plan is flexible – we can change it as time goes on,” he said. “It’s a working document, and we hope to be around many years to work on our plan.”

Sandy is also a Purdue University graduate. She came to Michigan State University for her master’s degree. She served as Michigan’s state 4-H leader from 1991 to 1998. Under her leadership, the Michigan 4-H China Project and the 4-H Chinese Art Exchange were established; she oversaw the official opening of the Michigan 4-H Children’s Garden; and she was a strong partner through the Kettunen Center Vision 2021 project. During her tenure as state 4-H leader, she also served as trustee and secretary of the Michigan 4-H Foundation Board of Trustees, and in 2014, she was elected honorary trustee.

“I was an MSU Extension staff member when I set up an endowment at the 4-H Foundation for 4-H leadership and community service,” Sandy said. “In addition to giving to that regularly, we have a planned gift that will go there when we’re both gone. I, too, was an Indiana 4-H member for 10 plus years, and part of my career was with 4-H. I was a regional supervisor and was the acting state 4-H leader, so 4-H has been important in my life growing up.”

During this capital campaign, Sandy and Noel have been members of the Leadership 10. They were lead individual donors to the county endowment match pool and co-hosted an event at Cowles House to help grow the match fund. They also helped lead a successful endowment campaign in Clinton County including hosting a kickoff event at the Stuckman farm.

“We really feel privileged to be in a position to do what we’re doing. And, though it takes time, there is satisfaction to know that we’re going to help 4-H youth, leaders and families.” Sandy said.

Sandy and Noel’s planned gift also qualified them as members of the A.G. Kettunen Society. The society was established in 2007 to provide lifetime recognition to donors who have made documented future gifts to 4-H. It allows donors to share their wishes and the impact they would like to see their gifts make to benefit Michigan’s youth. A.G. Kettunen Society members receive a recognition certificate, permanent acknowledgement as legacy donors in the annual report and, for gifts that bring a donor’s cumulative giving at or above $25,000 at maturity, recognition as Cornerstone Society members.

“Our comments may reflect that we had these plans in place all these years. It really has evolved over time,” Sandy said. “It is satisfying once you get there and sign the document and know it’s going to help people in the future.

“The most important thing is to start the conversation, no matter where you are in life, and see where the conversation can go. Never feel that it is too early to start the conversation. The staff are very good at helping you think through options and what you might want to do,” Sandy said.

If you are considering a planned or special gift, contact Amanda Masters at (517) 884-4691 or by e-mail at amasters@msu.edu.