Endowments: Creating a Legacy in Memory of Loved Ones

Two new endowments established by Ingrid Thacker and Deanna House will not only provide a lasting legacy for their husbands but also support the maintenance and long-term care of Kettunen Center facilities and grounds, and help sustain 4-H educational programs at Kettunen Center. Pictured above are the participants at the 4-H Mentoring Weekend at Kettunen Center July 22-24, 2016.
Two new endowments established by Ingrid Thacker and Deanna House will not only provide a lasting legacy for their husbands but also support the maintenance and long-term care of Kettunen Center facilities and grounds, and help sustain 4-H educational programs at Kettunen Center. Pictured above are the participants at the 4-H Mentoring Weekend at Kettunen Center July 22-24, 2016.

Kettunen Center, Michigan 4-H’s volunteer and youth development training facility, was fortunate enough to have two new endowment funds created this past year to support the maintenance and long term care of Kettunen Center facilities and its adjacent grounds. Support from these funds can also be used to sustain 4-H educational programs there.

An endowment is a fund that is permanently restricted – the corpus of the fund is invested and held intact, and the earnings from the fund are used for program support. Endowments provide a dependable and perpetual source of funding that, combined with other annual support, assures that 4-H opportunities are always available for youth.

These newly established endowment funds will not only support Kettunen Center in perpetuity, but will also serve as permanent memorials.

The Francis H. and Ingrid E. Thacker Endowment for Kettunen Center was created in memory of Francis Thacker by his wife, Ingrid Thacker, in appreciation for the positive influence of 4-H in Francis’ life.
“4-H was really the beginning of his life,” Ingrid Thacker said. “He was able to spend time with his brother. Those years really played a big role in their lives. It is really a good thing for kids to go through 4-H.”

Francis was a 4-H member and took great pride in his 4-H achievements. He went on to manage the family farm and was very involved with community affairs. He served as the LeRoy Township supervisor and for 25 years was an Osceola County commissioner. Additionally, he served 26 years on the Lake Osceola Soil Conservation District and over 20 years as a member of the LeRoy Historical Society. He was a lifelong member of the United Methodist Church in LeRoy until his passing in July 2014.

The George E. and Deanna J. House Endowment Fund for Kettunen Center was created in memory of George House by his wife, Deanna House, and their children, Sara and Paul, to recognize their family’s long-term involvement with 4-H as members, volunteers and donors.

“This fund honors George’s belief in 4-H and his long-term service on the board,” Deanna House said. “It was a good way to remember him long-term – it is also a good cause. “

4-H camps and centers like Kettunen Center are fading. They need to have support to keep them up-to-date,” she said.“This way, the funds from the endowment can be used as those in charge feel it’s needed well into the future.”

George and Deanna House both grew up as 4-H members in Illinois and Wisconsin. They went to college in Wisconsin, George at the University of Wisconsin and Deanna at the University of Wisconsin-Stout. After they married and moved to Michigan, they became highly valued Michigan 4-H volunteers, first in Kalamazoo County and then statewide.

George joined the Michigan 4-H Foundation Board of Trustees in 1979 and served on the board until 2009. In his 30 years as a trustee, he served as president, vice president and treasurer of the board. He believed in the power of dedicated facilities to foster positive youth development. He helped lead the $4.3 million campaign to renovate Kettunen Center, and also helped generate support for the facilities campaign for 4-H Camp Kidwell in Allegan County.

Deanna is well known as a nutrition and healthy foods columnist, author, consultant, speaker and 4-H volunteer. She helped young people see the value in healthy eating and cooking, and helped them develop the skills to do so successfully. When microwave cooking was introduced as a fast way to prepare meals, Deanna helped young people navigate this new technology by co-authoring the 4-H curriculum Microwave Connections.

“4-H shaped my life,” Deanna House said. “We both felt that we should be paying back, and youth are one of the things we believe in. This was a great fit.”

The Houses have been generous annual donors to 4-H for over three decades. In 2006, they also established the Founder’s Fund, an operational endowment for the Michigan 4-H Foundation, which promises to pay dividends of support for 4-H for many years to come.

A new grant from the Hal and Jean Glassen Foundation has provided a new 4-H shooting sports trailer to store and transport the equipment in order to increase 4-H youth involvement in the program statewide. Pictured above are 4-H shooting sports state trainers and several youth members of the Barry County 4-H Shooting Sports Club.
A new grant from the Hal and Jean Glassen Foundation has provided a new 4-H shooting sports trailer to store and transport the equipment in order to increase 4-H youth involvement in the program statewide. Pictured above are 4-H shooting sports state trainers and several youth members of the Barry County 4-H Shooting Sports Club.

A new grant from the Hal and Jean Glassen Foundation has provided a new 4-H shooting sports trailer to store and transport the equipment in order to increase 4-H youth involvement in the program statewide. Pictured above are 4-H shooting sports state trainers and several youth members of the Barry County 4-H Shooting Sports Club.

With a new grant from the Hal and Jean Glassen Memorial Foundation, the Michigan 4-H Shooting Sports Program was able to purchase a trailer to store and transport equipment.

“The Glassen Foundation support means our 4-H shooting sports program can continue to grow in number of volunteer leaders and equipment which translates to more youth involvement,” said Nick Baumgart, MSU Extension educator for environmental and outdoor education and shooting sports.

The Glassen Foundation’s focus is on environmental and outdoor education, shooting sports programs and enhancing wildlife, and animal welfare research.

“It’s one of our missions to support shooting sports education,” said Thomas Huggler, Glassen Foundation president. “It made sense for us to provide support for the trailer to export the program all over the state of Michigan.”

“Hal Glassen wanted us to make investments in shooting sports and youth education in shooting sports, hunting and conservation. By supporting 4-H, we are supporting two of the legs on this ‘stool,’” Huggler said.

Hal and Jean Glassen were avid hunters, outdoor enthusiasts and wildlife conservationists. They established the Glassen Foundation to continue their lifelong ambitions and goals. Hal, a University of Wisconsin graduate, was a partner in the Lansing law firm of Glassen, Rhead, McLean, Campbell and Schumacher and practiced law for 62 years prior to his death in 1992. Jean was the first woman to graduate from the University of Wisconsin. With a degree in bacteriology, she pursued a career as a biologist with the Michigan Department of Public Health.

“My own kids are active in Eaton County 4-H, including shooting sports,” Huggler said. “I know firsthand the value of the 4-H shooting sports program – I’ve seen the value from my kids, and they’re really enthused.

“When you think about it, the investment you make in shooting sports is small – kids learn confidence, new skills, cooperation – this is what 4-H is all about. For the low cost, the return on the investment is multiplied – the future of conservation, hunting and fishing is all resting on the shoulders of our youth,” he added.

In addition, the Glassen Foundation has annually sponsored the 4-H Shooting Sports Volunteer and Instructor Training Workshop at Kettunen Center since 2010.

“The 4-H Shooting Sports Workshop trains the 4-H volunteers who teach the youth – it’s the gift that keeps on giving. The trainers spread the influence and provide opportunity for kids all over the state of Michigan,” Huggler said. “These shooting sports and outdoor education programs are so important. That’s why we get so excited about it!”

The 4-H Shooting Sports Workshop, held each April, is one of the largest 4-H workshops at Kettunen Center. At the workshop, 4-H participants learn about the Michigan 4-H shooting sports mission, policies, risk management, safety, discipline-specific equipment use and care. Participants also develop and improve skills in teaching shooting sports activities to youth; learn how to develop, expand and maintain local 4-H shooting sports programs; and refresh and renew their respect and concern for safety in the 4-H shooting sports program. Adults who successfully complete the workshop and all other requirements receive certification as Michigan 4-H shooting sports instructors for the discipline in which they participate.

“The Glassen Foundation’s annual support reduces the cost of the annual 4-H leader certification workshop at Kettunen Center. In addition, Glassen has generously allowed us to purchase much needed equipment to enhance our training abilities,” Baumgart said.

From Vantage, Fall 2015

Founding Kettunen Center Caretakers Society membership gifts were received from the estate of George and Victoria Rock, Rodney and Mary Bellows, and jointly from Ingrid Thacker and her nephew, Brian Thacker, in memory of her husband, Francis, and his father, Tom Thacker. Pictured is Ingrid Thacker in front of the Kettunen Center Giving Tree.

Founding Kettunen Center Caretakers Society membership gifts were received from the estate of George and Victoria Rock, Rodney and Mary Bellows, and jointly from Ingrid Thacker and her nephew, Brian Thacker, in memory of her husband, Francis, and his father, Tom Thacker. Pictured is Ingrid Thacker in front of the Kettunen Center Giving Tree.

Kettunen Center received new endowment investments this year with the launch of the Kettunen Center Caretakers Society to grow the Kettunen Center Endowment Fund.

Founding Kettunen Center Caretakers Society membership gifts were received from the estate of George and Victoria Rock, Rodney and Mary Bellows, and jointly from Ingrid Thacker and her nephew, Brian Thacker, in memory of her husband, Francis, and his father, Tom Thacker. Members receive a special silver leaf on the Kettunen Center Giving Tree.

George and Vicki Rock, of Cadillac, were long-time supporters and friends of 4-H and Kettunen Center. In 2006, they established the John F. and Andrea E. Grix Endowment for Kettunen Center to provide annual support for Kettunen Center operations and educational programs and to honor and recognize John and Andrea Grix, Kettunen Center director and educational program coordinator, respectively. Vicki passed away in December 2013, and George passed just two months later, in February 2014. They remembered Kettunen Center with an estate gift, a gift that will leave a lasting legacy for future generations.

Victoria worked 21 years for the Midland school system and helped raise their three children. George, an Osceola County 4-H alumnus and Michigan State University graduate, worked 40 years for Dow Chemical Co., serving his last 15 years as business executive. After retiring, he became a venture capitalist partnering with MSU in technology. He was a member of the Rotary Clubs of both Midland and Cadillac for 30 years. Additionally, he was a founding contributor to the Mercy Hospital Endowment Fund and a co-founder of the Cadillac Area Land Conservancy, and he helped create the Cadillac Area Community Foundation Endowment.

Rodney and Mary Bellows chose to honor their 4-H involvement through a gift to the Kettunen Center Caretaker’s Society. Mary and her sister were 4-H members and received 4-H scholarships allowing them to attend Michigan State University. Upon graduation, Mary pursued a career in both MSU Extension 4-H and teaching, and her sister had a career in teaching. Rodney is a retired optometrist who had a  practice in Cadillac, where he and Mary raised their two children and now are proud grandparents. He  served as a 4-H volunteer in Wexford County, with special interest in geocaching.

Ingrid Thacker, of LeRoy, wished to honor her late husband, Francis Thomas, and his 4-H involvement with a special gift. Brian Thacker chose to also honor his father, Thomas Thacker, though this joint gift to Kettunen Center. The brothers, Francis and Thomas, grew up in 4-H together and took great pride in their 4-H achievements. Francis went on to manage the family farm and was very involved with community affairs. He served as the LeRoy Township supervisor and 25 years as an Osceola County commissioner. Additionally, he served 26 years on the Lake Osceola Soil Conservation District and over 20 years as a member of the LeRoy Historical Society. He was a lifelong member of the United Methodist Church in LeRoy until his passing in July 2014.

Thomas Thacker graduated from MSU and taught high school agriculture for two years at East Jordan, Michigan, where he remained active in 4-H until he was called to active duty in the Army Air Force. Following his service in WWII, Col. Thacker held various assignments worldwide, including the first professor of air science at the Michigan College of Mining and Technology, Houghton, Michigan, and logistics jobs at the Pentagon, among others. He retired from active duty in 1968 and became a real estate broker in Fairborn, Ohio, until 2000. He was president and founding member of Dawson Realty Inc., and served on the Greene County Board of Realtors. He was an adult leader and supporter of the Boy Scout program for over 60 years and a proud volunteer at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force for many years until his death in September 2012.

Growing the endowment for Kettunen Center is a priority of the Campaign for Michigan 4-H’s Future. As of Oct. 31, 2015, $70,110 has been raised — 14 percent of the $500,000 Kettunen Center Endowment goal.

 

Kettunen Center welcome sign

Kettunen Center,Kettunen Center Messy Science Day Michigan’s 4-H leadership training facility near Tustin, Michigan, has offered Environmental and Outdoor Education (EOE) programs since 1988 to help youth, adults and families develop an appreciation of and responsible commitment to the world around them.

Now, with support from the Osceola County Community Foundation and the General Mills Foundation/Yoplait of Reed City, Kettunen Center is able to place a higher emphasis on both STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) and healthy lifestyles education within its EOE program.

As a result of these grants, Kettunen Center offered two new Winter Days at Kett, day-long events for local families – Messy Science Day and Crafty Kids Day.

Messy Science Day was designed for families with pre-K to second-grade children. A variety of age-appropriate STEM activities were offered, including making slime, catapults and chemistry experiments. Kids learned about the differences between liquids and solids using everyday items.

“It really gives kids a chance to explore some of the basic science principles,” said Laura Jacobson-Pentces, Kettunen Center educational program coordinator. “We’re giving them the chance to experiment, make observations and understand those principles.
“Kids love these activities because they are fun and messy – they like to touch, feel and see things happen. It’s a nice combination for us to have STEM education where kids can learn and get messy.”

In addition, Kettunen Center will host students from Reed City, Pine River and Marion schools for the EOE program.

“Schools in our area continue to face budgetary challenges, and often field trips are not supported unless they are at reduced to no cost. Research has shown that educational field trips, particularly those that involve experiential learning, have extensions that last long after the field trip has concluded. Having students off-site and out of the boundaries of the classroom allows learning to occur outside of the daily framework,” Jacobson-Pentces said.

Fitness as a lifestyle is attainable by all, and according to research, children are more likely to be physically active if their parents/adults are active with them and they are doing activities that they enjoy.

“Our EOE program provides gateway experiences for youth, allowing them to explore and pursue physical activity beyond the realm of merely ‘exercise.’ The scope of our EOE program is to model activities for families and adults while encouraging the pursuit of wellness through these activities and showcasing healthy choices for snacking and meals,” she said.

According to a STEM report by the U.S. Department of Education, in a world that is becoming increasingly complex, where success is driven not only by what you know but by what you can do with what you know, it’s more important than ever for our youth to be equipped with knowledge and skills to solve tough problems, gather and evaluate evidence, and make sense of information.

“This support allows local students to have field-trip experiences that introduce, enhance and support these educational mandates, as well as provide extensions and continued learning beyond the field trip experience,” Jacobson-Pentces said.

The new Kettunen Center archery and firearms ranges, made possible by Thomas H. Cobb, will provide safe spaces for members of 4-H and other groups to learn and practice shooting sports skills.
Thomas H. Cobb

Thomas H. Cobb

Two shooting sports ranges opened at Kettunen Center in late August, thanks to a generous gift from Thomas H. Cobb, former Michigan 4-H Foundation trustee.

“I have been involved in the shooting sports in one way or another since my preteen years,” Cobb said. “I have fond memories of trying for years to outscore my father in skeet. But I never did! Living vicariously through talented young shooters is a real joy for me now. More and more colleges and universities have shooting sports programs and some offer scholarship programs for exceptional shooters. Who knows, a future Olympian may begin his or her career at Kettunen Center some day!”

Kettunen Center’s new archery and firearms ranges will offer a safe space for members of 4-H and other groups to learn and practice shooting sports skills.

“Having been a supporter of 4-H shooting sports programs for many years, I think Kettunen Center is the logical place for permanent ranges,” Cobb said. “These ranges seem to fit well in the original concept of Kettunen Center and will hopefully give a boost to the
whole program. More and more civic and corporate groups are looking to the shooting sports for retreat and teambuilding programs. In addition, it is the ideal place to train shooting instructors from all around the state.”

The new Kettunen Center archery and firearms ranges, made possible by Thomas H. Cobb, will provide safe spaces for members of 4-H and other groups to learn and practice shooting sports skills.

The new Kettunen Center archery and firearms ranges, made possible by Thomas H. Cobb, will provide safe spaces for members of 4-H and other groups to learn and practice shooting sports skills.

Each year, Kettunen Center hosts on average 150 participants at the 4-H volunteer and youth shooting sports training workshop. Additionally, the center often serves as a training site for public service agencies. Access to safe shooting sports facilities will complement these and other trainings held at Kettunen Center.

“My hope is that training youth in shooting sports will lead to an interest in hunting and other outdoor pursuits. Spending time pursuing small game or deer on a beautiful autumn afternoon in Michigan is something everyone should experience,” Cobb said.

Cobb served as a Michigan 4-H Foundation trustee from 1998 to 2009 and as president from 2004 to 2006. He established the Thomas H. Cobb Shooting Sports Fund in 1999 to support 4-H shooting sports initiatives and certification programs for 4-H volunteers  across the state. Cobb has been active as a consultant and adviser to a variety of non-profit organizations, including the Michigan Nature Conservancy, Crystal Lake Watershed Fund, and the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America-Michigan chapter.

Kettunen Center welcome sign
Rose Lockhart

D.J. McQuestion & Sons made a special gift in honor of Rose Lockhart (pictured above), Kettunen Center’s long-time food service manager who retired in December 2016.

This past year, D.J. McQuestion & Sons made a special gift in honor of Rose Lockhart, Kettunen Center’s long-time food service manager.

D.J. McQuestion & Sons, of LeRoy, has been a regular supporter of Kettunen Center’s Breakfast with Santa event for nearly two decades.

Specializing in a variety of construction projects, D.J. McQuestion and Sons strive to help their community by giving to organizations that support their community’s development and provide employment to the area’s residents.

“The McQuestions are supportive of the Kettunen Center community and wanted their donation to benefit the dining room or kitchen because of Rose’s longstanding time with that particular part of the Kettunen Center,” said Chris Gentry, Kettunen Center director.

D.J. McQuestion & Sons’ donation replaced 175 chairs and furnished 200 new chairs for the dining area and the Red Oak room. The gift will allow many Kettunen Center visitors to be comfortable during their meals and meetings for years to come.

Lockhart served as food service manager from 1996 until she retired in December 2016 to pursue her own catering business. She was an integral part of every visitor’s experience at the Kettunen Center because of her devotion to not only making good food, but encouraging a positive dining atmosphere.

“For long-time visitors to the Kettunen Center, the news of the retirement of Rose Lockhart, who has expertly managed dining services for Kettunen Center for 20 years, was bittersweet,” Gentry said. “She established a standard of hospitality and food services that visitors will long remember.

“Rose is very a conscientious person and very guest-focused. Kettunen Center’s whole dining room experience was enhanced because she made people feel welcome and she enjoyed interacting with guests. Quite simply, she made people feel at home,” Gentry said.

Many recognize Rose as a cornerstone of Kettunen Center because of her involvement not only in the Kettunen Center but also in the community, where she is active in her church’s food service needs. She left a legacy at the Kettunen Center that will continue to be honored in many ways, including the chairs, thanks to D.J. McQuestion & Sons’ gift.